Maslaha Seeds Limited, a renowned indigenous seed company, is set to release SDM6 maize hybrid seeds that can yield up to nine tonnes per hectare come 2018.

This was revealed by the company’s Executive Director, Corporate Affairs and Marketing, Abubakar Sa’id Dansadau, who spoke on behalf of the company at the recently concluded AgrikExpo and Conference held in Abuja.

Dansadau hinted that the hybrid seeds were developed using top cross method of hybridisation, making it one of the few hybrid seeds in the country that gives such optimum yield.

The executive director said the company has already released three varieties of pro-vitamin A enriched maize seed and urged farmers to embrace quality seeds.

“We are now promoting farmers to plant maize seeds that are pro-vitamin A because there is very high demand for it in the market mainly by processors and other companies, and they are open pollinated varieties – SAMMAZ 38 and SAMMAZ 39 – which gives around five to six tonnes per hectare,” he said.

He noted that the recommended planting rate is 53,000 stands per hectare, and 20kg per hectare seed requirement.

Abubakar further stated that the company is building one of Nigeria’s largest farmers’ network, known as the Farmers’ Loan Scheme which would help in building the capacity of farmers, through supplying them with farm inputs on credit to be repaid after successful harvest.

He added that the payment depends on the level of success of their harvest, adding that the company uses private means to encourage farmers to join the network.

Dansadau affirmed that they have established networks in Kaduna, Kebbi, Kano and Zamfara states where farmers have been registered, and E-mapping verification is used to validate the information of the farmers.

He said the programme has been running for 11 years now and that the only time they encountered issues was the first year where recovery was less than 70 per cent, adding that each year, the programme begins around March when distribution is done and by April, the seeds are delivered to the farmers.

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